When A Fatwa Comes True: tagi01

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN.  (Center) Gamar Tagili, 15, the daughter of slain writer Rafiq Tagi, sits with her mother (behind and to the left), the widow Maila Tagiyeva, 47, and Tagi's two sisters (behind and the two to the right) Yeguna and Durdana, during the third-day memorial in his apartment surrounded on November 26, 2011.  A critic until his very last article of Iran's theocratic regime with a fatwa ordered against his life by the late Iranian Ayatollah Fazil Lankarani and others in 2006, Tagi was once imprisoned for eight months in 2007 by Baku's secular ruling Aliyev family and stabbed repeatedly by a silent, unknown assailant while returning home the evening of November 19 and died of complications after having his spleen removed several days later; after initial silence, Azerbaijan authorities have opened an investigation and many of Azerbaijan's intelligentsia point their finger at Iran despite an official denial from the Iranian Embassy in Baku.

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN. (Center) Gamar Tagili, 15, the daughter of slain writer Rafiq Tagi, sits with her mother (behind and to the left), the widow Maila Tagiyeva, 47, and Tagi's two sisters (behind and the two to the right) Yeguna and Durdana, during the third-day memorial in his apartment surrounded on November 26, 2011. A critic until his very last article of Iran's theocratic regime with a fatwa ordered against his life by the late Iranian Ayatollah Fazil Lankarani and others in 2006, Tagi was once imprisoned for eight months in 2007 by Baku's secular ruling Aliyev family and stabbed repeatedly by a silent, unknown assailant while returning home the evening of November 19 and died of complications after having his spleen removed several days later; after initial silence, Azerbaijan authorities have opened an investigation and many of Azerbaijan's intelligentsia point their finger at Iran despite an official denial from the Iranian Embassy in Baku.